Search

In case you had any lingering doubts that ‘local’ activist groups are anything but, let us add one more example to the ever-growing list. A columnist named Farron Cousins recently wrote a piece for the anti-industry website, DeSmog Blog, claiming that the “dirty energy industry” had been responsible for overturning a ban on fracking within Fort Collins’ city limits. As it turns out, Cousins' grasp of geography isn't quite as strong as his grasp of senseless talking points.

Ignoring the Monterey Shale's potential, and denying our state the opportunity to grow the economy, create jobs and generate more revenues to pay for essential services, is exactly what the activists are demanding when they say California should impose a moratorium or outright ban on hydraulic fracturing. That’s not a rational position, it’s an ideological one, and it carries a huge price tag.

Is the combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing a new and “dangerous” technology – so “inherently risky” and full of threats unique to the process that we should just shut the whole thing down and call it a day, as shale gas opponents would have us believe?...

To hear opponents of shale development tell it, the combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing is a new and “dangerous” technology – so “inherently risky” and full of threats unique to the process that we should just shut the whole thing down and call it a day. But a recent survey of experts turns this carefully crafted talking point on its head by noting risks associated with developing oil and natural gas from shale are no different than the ones that industry and regulators have been managing well for over 100 years

Environmental groups are attacking disclosure requirements that have already won widespread acclaim from the environmental community. In fact, when those standards were adopted elswhere in the country, California environmental groups were directly involved in negotiating those disclosure requirements and actually took credit for them.

Earthjustice and other activist groups filed a lawsuit this week against the California Department of Conservation’s Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources (DOGGR). DOGGR has recently concluded public hearings gathering information for the express purpose of updating hydraulic fracturing regulations, its proposals are expected soon. It’s shameful that Earthjustice’s filing once again seeks to inject fear-mongering and misstatements of fact into what should be a scientific discussion about the safety of hydraulic fracturing at the very time regulators are seeking the most credible information.

Earthjustice and other activist groups filed a lawsuit this week against the California Department of Conservation's Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources (DOGGR). DOGGR has recently concluded public hearings gathering information for the express purpose of updating hydraulic fracturing regulations, its proposals are expected soon. It's shameful that Earthjustice's filing once again seeks to inject fear-mongering and misstatements of fact into what should be a scientific discussion about the safety of hydraulic fracturing at the very time regulators are seeking the most credible information.